The Weblog

This page contains news, event information, and other items added by the market managers.

“Thanks to all who make this possible!!” ~
DM, Greenville SC
“I’m really happy with everything I received. How juicy and tasty
I’m so thankful for reliable growers and market.” ~ MC, Greenville SC



 
Subscribe to an RSS Feed

New Farmer's Market Tomorrow


Dear Clemson Locally Grown Members, I would like to share some news with you about a wonderful Farmer’s Market that we and some of your favorite growers (like Hurricane Creek) are involved in. It happens every Tuesday evening from now until August 27th, and promises lots of fun and entertainment for you and your family in the evening hours. Please read below for all the details from Diana Vossbrinck. and remember that you can still order on CLG to pick up at the market below: ~ Donna

Dear Friends & AAFFA Members,
Many thanks to all of you who came out to the AAFFA Farmers Market season opener to dine, dance, play, and shop for farm-fresh-home-baked-hand-crafted goodies and treasure! We had such a FABULOUS time last Tuesday, we thought we’d treat you to a repeat performance this week!
AAFFA Farmers Market
Tuesdays 5-8 pm, June – August
402 North Murray Avenue at Tribble Street
Hosted by the ANDERSON AREA FARM & FOOD ASSOCIATION
There will be new vendors, and new crops coming into season … we are already hearing rumors about mushrooms and blackberries!
The patio will be open for dining, and this week’s featured restaurant will be Summa Joe’s! Joe will be joining our weekly regular, Grits & Groceries, serving up delicious meals to enjoy on our patio.
There is always live music, and this week we’ll be enjoying the sounds of local favorite, Sam Anderson!
Big news this week … The debut of the 2013 Market Chef competition!! Kicking off this year’s showdown will be chefs Troy Compton of McGee’s Irish Pub, taking on last year’s champion, Heidi Trull of Grits & Groceries. The ‘secret’ ingredient is always what can be found fresh from market vendors, but new rules promise a thrilling season of competition! Remember, you can taste and judge for just $2, but tickets are limited, so visit the AAFFA table early to purchase yours!
While you are there, pick up or re-new your annual AAFFA membership … it is your support that makes this all possible!
See you tomorrow!
Diana Vossbrinck
Anderson Area Farm & Food Association, vice-chair
AAFFA Farmers Market, manager
aaffa2013@gmail.com
864-933-0559

6/6/13 Harvest News; The Market is Open


-

Recipes

Kohlrabi
According to the “Huffington Post article”:, it’s easy to see how kohlrabi could throw you off your game the first time you see it. It looks like someone teleported a vegetable from Mars right into your kitchen. But in truth, kohlrabi is incredibly versatile. Kohlrabi, cabbage, Brussels sprouts and kale are all cousins, so you can expect that any flavor that goes nicely with one, will be lovely with the other.

After asking a formerly vegetarian friend what she likes to do with kohlrabi best, she said, “Honestly, just peel it, slice it, sprinkle it with salt and eat it raw.” We love her style and hope you follow suit. You can basically treat kohlrabi, both the green and purple varieties, like a sweet, overgrown radish. Do be sure to remove all of the peel (which is really tough), unless you plan to cook it until it’s soft.
www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/15/kohlrabi-recipes_n_1597114.html?
“Kohlrabi is a vegetable that reminds me of a potato crossed with an artichoke heart. I roast it with garlic and Parmesan cheese.” — WSBLEND

  • ROASTED KOHLRABI*
    Serves Three to Four
    (received 4.5 stars out of 5 in 77 ratings)
    INGREDIENTS
    4 kohlrabi bulbs, peeled
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 clove garlic, minced
    salt and pepper to taste
    1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Directions
1.Preheat an oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C).
2.Cut the kohlrabi into 1/4 inch thick slices, then cut each of the slices in half. Combine olive oil, garlic, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Toss kohlrabi slices in the olive oil mixture to coat. Spread kohlrabi in a single layer on a baking sheet.
3.Bake in the preheated oven until browned, 15 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally in order to brown evenly. Remove from oven and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Return to the oven to allow the Parmesan cheese to brown, about 5 minutes. Serve immediately.
Adapted from Allrecipes.com

Market News

WELCOME Upstate Locally Grown Members.

THE MARKET IS OPEN FOR ORDERING!

Order today for pickup Tuesday from 5-6 PM at Anderson Farmer’s Market, Putney Farm Booth, Tuesday 4-6 at Swamp Rabbit Café, and Tuesday 4-8PM or Wed 8-8 at Whole Foods Market, Greenville.
NEW DROP-OFF ARRANGEMENTS BEGIN IN JUNE: Beginning on June 4, Putney Farm/ Upstate Locally Grown Market will have a farmer’s Market booth on Tuesday from 5-8PM at Anderson Farmer’s Market.
Where: Anderson Farmer’s Market
When: 5-8 PM on Tuesdays.
What: Farmer’s Market Booth and CLG pick-up opportunity. Many of your favorite growers will be there with their fresh veggies and fruit. This will be an opportunity to pick up extras that aren’t (yet) offered on USLG. Just choose the Anderson Drop-off and we will have your orders ready for you there.
Donna
A REVIEW OF OUR POLICIES: THE WELCOME LETTER:

_Welcome to Upstate Locally Grown Market, where you may enjoy a delectable array of locally and sustainably produced choices.
Feel free to browse anytime.
Ordering:

  • The market will be open for ordering from Thursday at 6pm until Monday 12pm.
  • Go to the Market page and browse fresh, sustainable local items directly from the grower.
  • When you are finished ordering, Proceed to check-out, where you may make notes under each item to specify your wishes. i.e.: “I would like a serving for four”….or “The smallest piece you have, please”… or, “Please phone me with the final price of my meat” etc.
    *Please be free with your comments and questions in the comment section at ordering. We will read it and take care of your questions. We want to make getting your locally grown products easy for you!_

_ * Upon completing your order, you will receive an automatic e-mail with your order totals. *IMPORTANT: If you do not receive a confirmation email with your order on it, then your order did not go through.. and your products would still be in your shopping cart, where we cannot see them.
If this is the case, try again, or email upstatesc@locallygrown.net for instructions.
*Payment is convenient. Simply click on the PayPal Donate Button anywhere you see it on the site after you receive your confirmation totals. You may deposit any amount and draw down, or deposit the exact amount; it is up to you. These credits are to be used for products or membership only, as we are not able to refund your credits in cash. Remember that the meat and cheese orders will be adjusted to the actual weight of each piece after you order, so please allow for this.
Spending credits: When you deposit to PayPal, we will post the credits to your USLG account. The software does the math and will credit and subtract when you order. These funds are not refundable in cash.
You must spend all of your funds before becoming inactive, or else donate it to Upstate Locally Grown operating funds, as it is not refundable in cash.
We hope that you enjoy being a part of the Upstate Locally Grown family.
We also hope that you will want to become part of the cooperative effort between farmer and consumer that we have created here. If you would like to learn about volunteer opportunities, please respond to this email, or send me a note at upstatesc@locallygrown.net

Your Market Manager
Donna Putney
864-353-6096 text
upstatesc@locallygrown.net_*What happened Last week*, you say? Some of you may have wondered why the markets didn’t open last week. Well, The Putneys have both been ill lately, with Lenard having been in the hospital. We have been suffering from a bacterial infection and we believe we have found the source in our water lines, so are thinking that we will quickly recover. We plan to go full speed this week.


What’s new this week? Green onions *are looking good! So are the *nasturtiums, so get some to add a peppery interest to your tossed salads. Kohlrabi is at its finest. You can use it fresh in salads and slaws, or try our recipe to the left. Strawberries and lettuces are on the way out, but there are still plenty of greens for your dining pleasure. Summer squash is coming along, and tomatoes are putting on some steam. *WE HAVE POTATOES! * Our first picking of Yukon Gold potatoes was a wonderful surprise! We had no idea what was going on underground till a couple of rogue hens scratching in the straw scratched up a couple of huge taters! So, Lenard and I began to feel around under there and found some beautiful new potatoes for you! They are crispy and buttery and melt in your mouth! Be sure to order some this week, and make a note of whether you want large or small ones.

OCCASIONAL CSA:(NEW) What you will see in the occasional CSA this week: an array of lettuces from Putney Farm, with Amaranth and Lamb’s quarters, spring onion, an herb sampler, and edible flowers to garnish a freshly harvested garden green and herb salad. ( Suggestion: A simple vinaigrette of extra-virgin olive oil, herb, balsamic or wine vinegar, salt and pepper is best to allow the other flavors of the herbs, greens and flowers to shine through.)
The featured eggs will be Jumbo Fresh Duck Eggs. These jumbo eggs are wonderful for baking, because they add fluff to cakes, pancakes, etc. Besides baking, the rich flavor and texture also lend a boost to an _egg salad _or potato salad, and we love them as boiled, fried, or scrambled eggs. Your CSA bag will be rounded off with a cheese, and a protein. Order early while quantities last.

COMING EVENTS


SMALL ACTS, WHEN MULTIPLIED BY MILLIONS OF PEOPLE, CAN TRANSFORM THE WORLD
lET YOUR VOICE BE HEARD:
The Greenville March against Monsanto was a great success, as was the get-together afterward at Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery. We have formed some great friendships and made some strong and healthy alliances with this group of concerned citizens, which will positively affect the future of Upstate Locally Grown and help us to grow in the direction we are looking for. You will hear more about this in coming newsletters, but I can tell you that it will be all good news!
Facebook Page here Website: Here. What’s it all about?The March against Monsanto world-wide mission statement can be found here
Watch the full length documentary “The World According to Monsanto” here
Basically, our local group is concerned about 1)unwanted GMO’s showing up in our foods without giving us a choice whether we want these or not. 2)There is no law about labeling, so we want labeling to be mandatory. 3)We also are concerned with the loss of the bee and pollinators due to use of systemic pesticides that remain in the plant and its pollen. 4) Educating folks about these issues and more environmental concerns is a major part of our mission, and USLH plans to be a part in this education. If you follow us on Facebook, you already know that we are generating lots of links to sources of studies and other info to keep us in the know on these issues. Please “follow us (Upstate Locally Grown)”: https://www.facebook.com/upstatelocallygrown?ref=hl if you would like to know more.

You are the US in USLG!


We thank you for joining us in the effort to bring Fresh, Local, Sustainable Food from Farm to Table in the most convenient way possible.

Clemson Locally Grown Harvest News 5/23/13


-

Recipes

Strawberries and Mangos with Mint Sugar
adapted from Fine Cooking Magazine

Serves Three to Four

ingredients:
2 TBS granulated sugar (or Stevia)
4-6 fresh mint leaves *
1 pint Strawberries,* hulled and sliced
1 Mango, peeled, seeded, and diced (or)
1 Kiwi, peeled, sliced, and diced.

Yogurt for serving (Optional)
Instructions:
Process the sugar and mint leaves in a coffee grinder ( or pound the mint and half the sugar in a mortar until finely ground, stir in the remaining sugar) In a medium sized bowl, toss the strawberries and mango (or kiwi) cubes with the mint sugar. Let the fruit sit for 5-10 minutes to dissolve the sugar. Serve topped with a dollop of yogurt, if you like.

Market News

WELCOME Clemson Locally Grown Members.

THE MARKET IS OPEN FOR ORDERING!

Order today for pickup Tuesday from 4-5:15 PM at Clemson Montessori School., Tuesday 4-6 at Swamp Rabbit Café, and Wed 8-8 at Whole Foods Market, Greenville.
*NEW DROP-OFF ARRANGEMENTS BEGIN IN JUNE:
Beginning on June 4, Putney Farm/ Upstate Locally Grown Market will have a farmer’s Market booth on Tuesday from 5-8PM at Anderson Farmer’s Market.
Where: Anderson Farmer’s Market
When: 5-8 PM on Tuesdays.
What: Farmer’s Market Booth and CLG pick-up opportunity. Many of your favorite growers will be there with their fresh veggies and fruit. This will be an opportunity to pick up extras that aren’t (yet) offered on CLG.
If some of you cannot make it then, we are hoping that we will have a volunteer to relay your products to you in Clemson, or have an earlier drop-off; or……What is your thought about it? Please let me know here what your ideas are; we are a cooperative effort, and your ideas help to run our market better. Donna

OCCASIONAL CSA:(NEW) What you will see in the occasional CSA this week: an array of baby lettuces from Putney Farm, with a few micro greens of amaranth and Lamb’s quarters, a spring onion, an herb sampler, and edible flowers to garnish a freshly harvested garden green and herb salad. ( Suggestion: A simple vinaigrette of extra-virgin olive oil, herb, balsamic or wine vinegar, salt and pepper is best to allow the other flavors of the herbs, greens and flowers to shine through.)
The featured eggs will be Jumbo Fresh Duck Eggs. These jumbo eggs are wonderful for baking, because they add fluff to cakes, pancakes, etc. Besides baking, the rich flavor and texture also lend a boost to an _egg salad _or potato salad, and we love them as boiled, fried, or scrambled eggs. Your CSA bag will be rounded off with braising greens, a cheese, and a pint of freshly harvested strawberries for dessert. Order early while quantities last.

COMING EVENTS


CFSA Farm tours June 1-2
2013 Upstate Farm Tour – Volunteers Needed! You may wish to volunteer as a greeter at a favorite farm for one day of the tours and get a free LOGO gift, as well as FREE entrance to any/all of the farms on the tour on the day that you aren’t volunteering! Ashley Jordan is the volunteer coordinator for the tours this year! Contact Ashley @ ashleyjordan962@gmail.com You may also reach Ashley at 864-940-0994. Act soon, as the volunteer slots are filling up!

SMALL ACTS, WHEN MULTIPLIED BY MILLIONS OF PEOPLE, CAN TRANSFORM THE WORLD
lET YOUR VOICE BE HEARD:

March Against Monsanto, a world-wide event happening on May 25

!
http://clemson.locallygrown.net/files/photo/image/9526/thumb/be_proactive.jpg?1368832777!

These are family-friendly, peaceful marches, with informative speakers. Please feel free to make a sign, and if you do, use no sharp points on the stick. And, wear red if you can. See March against Monsanto on Facebook for lots of great info.
March Against Monsanto ANDERSON takes place Sat. May 25th at 11am at the Anderson County Farmers Market! There will be local businesses and farms, music, speeches, info booths, and hopefully a full scale march. Please come out, spread the word, join something that matters to each of our bodies and the sake of our planet!
*March Against Monsanto Greenville takes place the same day at one o’clock.
Here is copy from the Facebook page: “On May 25, activists around the world will unite to March Against Monsanto.
Meet at County Square in Greenville, SC – 1:00 pm. We will march. Wear red. Bring Signs (no bigger than 20X30 with a blunt post – no sharp points). Bring your voice.” Facebook Page here Website: Here. This will be a world-wide event. The Greenville group wishes to keep this peaceful. We just want our voices heard and want labeling so that we know what we are eating. If you would like to join the marches, go to the MAM event page on Facebook and let them know that you will be there. But, you are welcome to join in at any rate.

What’s it all about?The March against Monsanto world-wide mission statement can be found here
Watch the full length documentary “The World According to Monsanto” here

You are the US in USLG!


We thank you for joining us in the effort to bring Fresh, Local, Sustainable Food from Farm to Table in the most convenient way possible.

Harvest News for 5/17/13 Featuring Edible Flowers


-




Upstate Locally Grown Market CLEMSON
http://clemson.locallygrown.net/

To Contact Us

CLICK HERE TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT STATUS
TO CONTACT US
Market Administrator
Donna Putney

HARVEST NEWS EDITOR/ CLEMSON MARKET MANAGER
Heidi Williams

Recipes

Rose Petal Tea

Ingredients:

2 cups fresh fragrant rose petals available “here”:
3 cups water
Honey or granulated sugar to taste

  • All roses that you intend to consume must be free of pesticides. Do not use or eat flowers from florists, nurseries, or garden centers. In many cases these flowers have been treated with pesticides not labeled for food crops. The tastiest roses are usually the most fragrant.

Preparation:

Clip and discard bitter white bases from the rose petals; rinse petals thoroughly and pat dry.

In a small saucepan over medium-high heat, place the prepared rose petals. Cover with water and bring just to a simmer; let simmer for approximately 5 minutes, or until the petals become discolored (darkened).
Remove from heat and strain the hot rose petal liquid into teacups. Add honey or sugar to taste.
Makes 4 servings.

Market News

WELCOME Upstate Locally Grown and Clemson Locally Grown Members.

THE MARKET IS OPEN FOR ORDERING!

Order today for pickup Tuesday from 4-5:15PM at Clemson Montessori School.*, Tuesday 4-6 at Swamp Rabbit Café, and Wed 8-8 at Whole Foods Market, Greenville.
CCASIONAL CSA
What You Might See in Your CSA this Week: *Greens *are in transition from winter to spring, so, while there aren’t a vast array, they are still very fresh, tender, and delicious! So, greens like kale, green garlic or green onions, Lamb’s Quarters (A spinach relative) either beef or Chicken, eggs, fresh herbs like bee balm, Lemon Balm, and mint, flowers. It will exceed the value of only $25. Order today and get the best of the spring offerings!
As always, we at USLG are pleased to offer you plenty of fresh, local proteins and produce, as well as eggs from Putney Farm, Happy Cow milk products, Swamp Rabbit baked goods, and much, much more. All of our proteins are free-ranged, and never any hormones given. Our veggies are raised without chemicals, too! And they are picked within hours of you getting them! How fresh is that?

EDIBLE FLOWERS
Edible flowers are the new rage in haute cuisine
In general Edible flower care:
Remove the stamens and styles from the flowers before eating. The pollen can detract from the flavor of the flower. In addition, the pollen may cause an allergic reaction in some individuals. Remove the sepals of all flowers except violas, Johnny-jump-ups, and pansies. Shake each flower to dislodge insects hidden in the petal folds. After having removed the stamen, wash the flowers under a fine jet of water or in a strainer placed in a large bowl of water. Drain and allow to dry on absorbent paper. The flowers will retain their odor and color providing they dry quickly and that they are not exposed to direct sunlight.
STORING THE FLOWERS: Preserving Edible Flowers:

To store flowers, put them on moist paper and place together in a hermetically-sealed container or in plastic wrapping. This way, certain species can be preserved in the refrigerator for some 10 days.
If the flowers are limp, they can be revitalized by floating them on icy water for a few moments; don’t leave too long or else they will lose some of their flavor.
You can also store the whole flower in a glass of water in the refrigerator overnight.

I was just thinking today about gathering some honeysuckle flowers. Their indescribably lovely scent is really quite “heady” in the breeze today. So, I did some research on edible flowers and came up with some interesting info and good recipes featuring the flowers that are now in season. These featured flowers will be available from Putney Farm. None of the advice is mine. It al came from the sites listed below. This isn’t medical advice; it’s just folk crafts. Because Honeysuckle is blooming all over the countryside, I got more info on this; do your own research and so if you can find more recipes. If you do, please share! Be sure to read the precautions; and NEVER eat honeysuckle berries. So, fix yourself a cup of honesuckle flower tea and read on:

Honeysuckle flowers are edible;
Since 659 AD, Honeysuckle has been considered one of the most important herbs for releasing poisons from the body & for reducing fever.
The three main parts of the honeysuckle plant that are used medicinally are the flowers, flower buds & stems. The flowers have been used to make syrup that has been used as an expectorant for bad coughs & asthma.
Honeysuckle is used by herbalists to clear away toxic substances, also to kill or inhibit the action of germs. It is used to cool & reduce fever and heat. It reduces ulcers, sore throat, skin infections and clears the lungs & strengthens general health.
The flowers can be infused to create a hot tea that can be used as an expectorant. Honeysuckle is often combined with other herbs (including cowslip & mulberry) to create a tea that is used to treat coughs & mild symptoms of asthma.
Because it is a natural antibiotic, honeysuckle can also be used for infections caused by staph or strep bacteria. Honeysuckle should be used for acute illnesses. It is not meant to be used in the treatment of chronic conditions.
Honeysuckle is useful in reducing rashes from skin diseases and poison oak, in which case it should be used as a poultice. For cuts or abrasions that could become infected, an external honeysuckle infusion can be applied.(2
Honeysuckle for Headache Relief
Honeysuckle has been used for years to help treat and relieve server headaches naturally because of its ability to bring down inflammation and relieve pain. Making a honeysuckle tea by boiling two spoons full of dried honeysuckle flowers or leaves in a cup or two of water for ten minutes and than sipping on the tea can help ease headaches right away naturally.
A Honeysuckle Bath Soak for Skin Rashes
Soaking in a honeysuckle bath made with honeysuckle flowers and leaves can help relieve all kinds of skin rashes naturally such as poison ivy, oak and sumac, allergic reaction rashes, eczema, bacterial, psoriasis and thrush. The reason why is because honeysuckle has the ability to pull poisons and toxins out of the body naturally while killing bacteria and relieving inflammation and redness. Honeysuckle even has the potent vitamins, minerals and antioxidants in it that can help nourish and heal the skin naturally too. Some people even use honeysuckle tinctures in clay masks to help treat and cure acne on the face and body. I personally find honeysuckle baths relaxing and detoxifying.
Taking Honeysuckle for Treating the Cold and Flu
Sipping on hot honeysuckle tea with a bit of honey can help boost the immune system and fight of the cold or flu naturally. It even has the ability to reduce high fevers, soothe sore throats, ease coughing, relieve sinus pressure and diarrhea, ease ways nausea and vomiting and help reduce mild respiratory congestion. The antibacterial and anti-viral properties along with the vitamins C and antioxidants even can help treat infections caused by strep bacteria so when you have strep throat start sipping on cups of honeysuckle tea throughout the day to help ease the infection away naturally.
Precautions When Using Honeysuckle
Honeysuckle can cause allergic reaction in people who are allergic to it. Women pregnant should not use this Chinese herbal medicine to treat any health condition naturally because the side effects of not yet known. Those who have blood-clotting problems should not use this herb since it can slow down the bloods clotting ability. Otherwise, honeysuckle is relatively safe and a wonderful naturally remedy to use to treat many common healthy conditions naturally after speaking with a doctor to find out if the herb is right for you to use. 3

Bee Balm (Monarda didyma) – Also called Wild Bergamot, Wild Oswego Tea, Horsemint, Monarda. Wild bee balm tastes like oregano and mint. The taste of bee balm is reminiscent of citrus with soft mingling of lemon and orange. The red flowers have a minty flavor. Any place you use oregano, you can use bee balm blossoms. The leaves and flower petals can also be used in both fruit and regular salads. The leaves taste like the main ingredient in Earl Gray Tea and can be used as a substitute.
CLOVER:Clover (Trifolium species) – Sweet, anise-like, licorice. White and red clover blossoms were used in folk medicine against gout, rheumatism, and leucorrhea. It was also believed that the texture of fingernails and toenails would improve after drinking clover blossom tea. Native Americans used whole clover plants in salads, and made a white clover leaf tea for coughs and colds.
Mint (Mentha spp) – The flavor of the flowers are minty, but with different overtones depending on the variety.
Mint flowers and leaves are great in Middle Eastern dishes.

Roses (Rosa rugosa or R. gallica officinalis) – Flavors depend on type, color, and soil conditions. Flavor reminiscent of strawberries and green apples. Sweet, with subtle undertones ranging from fruit to mint to spice. All roses are edible, with the flavor being more pronounced in the darker varieties. In miniature varieties can garnish ice cream and desserts, or larger petals can be sprinkled on desserts or salads. Freeze them in ice cubes and float them in punches also. Petals used in syrups, jellies, perfumed butters and sweet spreads. NOTE: Be sure to remove the bitter white portion of the petals.
1)http://whatscookingamerica.net/EdibleFlowers/EdibleFlowersMain.htm

2)http://www.localharvest.org/honeysuckle-flowers-medicinal-dried-herb-C9366
3)http://voices.yahoo.com/medicinal-uses-honeysuckle-9121533.html
*This is not Medical advice. See a Doctor for serious illness.

Donna’s Corner


CFSA Farm tours June 1-2
2013 Upstate Farm Tour – Volunteers Needed! You may wish to volunteer as a greeter at a favorite farm for one day of the tours and get a free LOGO gift, as well as FREE entrance to any/all of the farms on the tour on the day that you aren’t volunteering! Ashley Jordan is the volunteer coordinator for the tours this year! Contact Ashley @ ashleyjordan962@gmail.com You may also reach Ashley at 864-940-0994. Act soon, as the volunteer slots are filling up!
SMALL ACTS, WHEN MULTIPLIED BY MILLIONS OF PEOPLE, CAN TRANSFORM THE WORLD

March Against Monsanto, a world-wide event happening on May 25


March Against Monsanto ANDERSON takes place Sat. May 25th at 11am at the Anderson County Farmers Market! There will be local businesses and farms, music, speeches, info booths, and hopefully a full scale march. Please come out, spread the word, join something that matters to each of our bodies and the sake of our planet!
*March Against Monsanto Greenville takes place the same day at one o’clock.
Here is copy from the Facebook page: “On May 25, activists around the world will unite to March Against Monsanto.
Meet at County Square in Greenville, SC – 1:00 pm. We will march. Wear red. Bring Signs (no bigger than 20X30 with a blunt post – no sharp points). Bring your voice.” Facebook Page here Website: Here. This will be a world-wide event. The Greenville group wishes to keep this peaceful. We just want our voices heard and want labeling so that we know what we are eating. If you would like to join the marches, go to the MAM event page on Facebook and let them know that you will be there. But, you are welcome to join in at any rate.

What’s it all about?The March against Monsanto world-wide mission statement can be found here
Watch the full length documentary “The World According to Monsanto” here


Upstate Locally Grown donates 3 percent of our order sales right off the top to Broken Wing Farm, a project to teach autistic boys the art of growing food.
Clemson Locally Grown donates 3% of the sales to Clemson Montessori School in appreciation for welcoming us to use their nice shady parking lot for our drop-off.

Weblog Entry


Good morning! your market is open for ordering. We are working on a more lengthy and “newsey” newsletter to follow; which we have to squeeze in between planting the future harvests. :-)
You will find new edible flowers, greens, and spring onions added to this week’s fare, plus additional meat cuts from Bar T Ranch. For Clemson folks, you may have to go to www.upstatesc.locallygrown.net to see all the cuts of beef, then make a note for us on your Clemson order, as Mr. Taylor is in the process of listing all the cuts on Clemson site.
And, Oh, yes, it has been great weather for strawberries! Remember that the season only lasts for a short while, so please order ahead and freeze for future use, so you can have local strawberries throughout the year.
A tip: rinse your strawberries in a solution of vinegar and water, and you will find that they last longer.
The newsletter to follow will give you ideas on how to use edible flowers in your everyday meals, not only to make them pretty, but also to add to your health!
Happy shopping!
Donna and Lenard Putney
putneyfarm@aol.com or upstatesc@locallygrown.net

More Beef, Fresh Strawberries


A little reminder that we now have fresh picked organic strawberries *available! MMMMM, Delicious!
Also new are *lamb’s quarters *at their best! If you haven’t tasted these spinach relatives, you are in for a very pleasant surprise!
*Beef:
Bar T Ranch has just processed beef, and has added many cuts to the list. If you have been waiting for your favorite cuts; now is the time to order them!
Happy shopping!
Donna 864-353-6096 text
upstatesc@locallygrown.net (email).

Lip Smakin' Good Strawberries are Here!


Mouth-watering, lip-smakin’ good Organic strawberries from Welch and son farm have become available today! YEAY! Just go to the market page, type in straw, and you will get all of the sizes available, as well as some recipes. Yes, it is okay to order twice; just in case you have already sent your order in.
This will also be your reminder notice to order before Monday.

Donna

Ordering is Open


Hello! Ordering is open for drop-off on Tuesday May 14 starting at 4:30-5:30.
We are all very busy trying to get our fields planted between rains; the ground is already saturated, and it is not too good for the soil to plow wet ground. But, we have plenty of good crops in store for you for this late spring and summer. Our tomatoes have grown a couple of feet already, and some have little green ones already, too. Potatoes are going wild! Sweet potato slips are ready, some are already in; some top be planted as soon as this letter goes out. We put in green beans, beets, chard, and onions already. Lettuce is looking very healthy. Hang in there a couple more weeks.
Many of you have committed to CSA’s; many of you are picking up things you need at local Farmer’s Markets, and that is great. This means that the conscious of the Upstate has been raised to the point of being more aware of where your food comes from and supporting local growers! Please be careful, though, while you are out there shopping, and _please ask _two very important questions: 1) “Is this produce from your farm?” 2)“What pesticides are used in growing this produce?”
Other questions that might serve you well to ask are: “How important is it to you to use GMO free seeds?” “What antibiotics do you use in your feed?” If you are not satisfied with the answers, please just move along to the next booth. Plenty of growers out there go that extra mile to bring you delicious food free of any chemicals. We only allow that kind of grower and that kind of food on our market site. We pre-screen, we visit their farms, we know the growers personally, and that they do grow what they sell; or label it as whose it is.
We would like to make something clear now: there is only ONE protein grower who is certified organic, and that is because his cattle are totally grass fed. The reason that others aren’t certified organic? Anyone who feeds grain at any time in the animal’s life most certainly has fed something tainted with GMOs. We cannot get organic feed here in SC without paying huge shipping costs which make the feed 3 times or more what we are now buying. Local groups are working on this situation, but that is how it is at the present. Local growers are lucky to break even today with the sky-rocketing feed costs as it is, and would have to more than triple the cost of our products to just stay even. Think about it: would you pay three or more times as much for Organic eggs/chicken/beef/lamb/turkey/goat milk/cheese? We would like to know what you think about this.
The problem all boils down to “Round-up Ready Corn” and “Round up Ready Soy”.
This March against Monsanto thing is worth looking into, folks. We don’t hate Monsanto. We don’t want anyone to go broke. We just want a choice about what we eat. We would like labeling so we know what products have possible GMO’s in them. At this point, we don’t know. We have no idea about the feed we give our animals, nor the baby formula we give our infants. Please look into what all this fuss is about and be pro-active. Let the world know that millions of us want clean food and heirloom veggies. Even our seeds are at risk, as Monsanto buys up the seed companies and Patents our heirloom seeds that have been passed from generation-to generation. There used to be laws; like anti-trust laws that prevented companies from being so big and controlling so much. Where did these laws go? There used to be laws against conflict of interest; yet many of our lawmakers and even the FDA execs have been Monsanto employees. YIKES! What has slipped up on us? If you care about our food, please go onto Facebook and “like” Putney Farm, Upstate Locally Grown, and March against Monsanto Greenville SC. You are in for an awakening. There is a plethora of info about what is happening.
Okay, folks, so I have ranted. It is because I care about the food that you eat so passionately that this one issue has captured my attention to the point of it being a mission: a mission of saving our food systems from total chemical contamination and genetically engineered seed that messes with our health.
We will have a drop-off this week if we receive sufficient orders to cover transportation; if not, then we will save your orders for next week.
Feedback is welcome. We are all a part of USLG, and we all have a voice. Please help me to take this market in the direction it needs to go from here.
Best to all of you!
Donna and Lenard Putney

Don't Miss the Monday Deadline for This Week's Order.


Hello Folks! There is still time to get your order in to the growers if you complete it before noon on Monday.
Since the crops are picked especially for you, you cannot find any fresher! Add to this the convenience of buying directly from each grower’s farm while online, and you have the best of both worlds. You purchase sustainable foods from trusted farmers, and yet, you can even shop in your jammies if you want! We pick it up from the grower, pack it up for you, and drop it off at a convenient spot!
So, hurry and make your selections before the noon Monday deadline to get your this week’s delivery.
www.clemson.locallygrown.net/market

Market is Open for 5/7 Drop-off


-




Upstate Locally Grown Market CLEMSON
http://clemson.locallygrown.net/

To Contact Us

CLICK HERE TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT STATUS
TO CONTACT US
Market Administrator
Donna Putney

HARVEST NEWS EDITOR/ CLEMSON MARKET MANAGER
Heidi Williams

Recipes


SOME NATURAL SOLUTIONS TO COMMON HOUSEHOLD PESTS:
DE:
Fleas, roaches, silverfish, ants etc #1
sprinkle food grade diatomaceous earth (DE) on carpets furniture, pet bedding, baseboard, behind furniture etc. leave as long as possible ( this can be left behind furniture etc, hours, days weeks months) vacuum up any in areas where you walk or sit after fleas are gone. Safe for kids & animals. so safe we feed it to our animals & we take it daily.
BORAX:
Fleas, roaches, silverfish, ants etc #2
Sprinkle Borax on carpets furniture, baseboards, behind furniture etc. leave as long as possible & Vacuum up
VINEGAR
Pet accidents
Straight warmed vinegar, cover with folded towel & let sit
Or use a mixture of white vinegar, peroxide & eucalyptus oil, cover with folded towel & let sit.
BAKING SODA:
Or make a paste of baking soda, peroxide with eucalyptus essential oil, cover with folded towel & let sit then vacuum up once dry.
MINT:
To repel spiders
Spray bottle with 10 drops of liquid soap & 10 to 20 drops peppermint essential oil, spray spiders & spray areas where the hang out.
_____________________

I am NOT a doctor. This page is for education only, and is NOT intended to be medical advice. Always talk with your health practitioner before taking any herbs or supplements.
Natural and Frugal

Natural Cleaning Solutions from National Geographic Green Living
The most economical way to give your home an eco-friendly cleaning is with natural do-it-yourself cleaning solutions you make with gentle, everyday household products. Chemical-laden cleaners create toxic fumes and may promote growth of bacteria resistant to antibacterial drugs(see References 1). Look no further than under the sink or in the pantry for these multitasking, economical, nontoxic ingredients that work alone or in combination to effectively give dirt the boot from every room.

Vinegar
The slightly acidic nature of white vinegar makes it effective at dissolving grease, soap scum and lime deposits from smooth surfaces in the kitchen and bathroom. Because it’s so gentle, vinegar is also safe to use on hardwood floors. Mix 1/4 to 1/2 cup of vinegar with water in a bucket or spray bottle and use it to clean everything from windows and mirrors to toilets and floors. Use undiluted vinegar to tackle tougher cleaning jobs. (See References 3)

Baking Soda
Baking soda not only deodorizes, but also acts as a green cleaning and brightening abrasive that rivals traditional powdered cleansers. Sprinkle hard surfaces in the bathroom and kitchen with baking soda and rub into a paste with a wet cloth, then rinse and wipe dry with a clean cloth. To remove stains or clean the inside of a messy oven, allow the paste to set for several minutes before rinsing; to boost the abrasive action for tougher cleaning jobs, add kosher salt to the paste. Sprinkle baking soda onto carpets and vacuum to freshen fibers. (See References 2)

Lemon Juice
Lemon juice cuts grease, kills mold and mildew and leaves a streak-free shine on hard surfaces of all kinds. Combine lemon juice with other pantry staples such as vinegar or olive oil to make cleaning products that work harder, and to leave a fresh, natural scent behind when the job is done. (See References 6 )

Sodium Borate
Available in the laundry detergent aisle, sodium borate, or borax, has a long history as a nontoxic powdered laundry booster, but it’s also effective in homemade cleaning products to disinfect kitchen and bathroom surfaces, cookware and floors (see References 4). Remove stains from laundry before washing by rubbing a paste of dishwasher detergent and sodium borate into the fabric and rinsing (see References 1).

Hydrogen Peroxide
The bubbling action of hydrogen peroxide does wonders in lifting stubborn gunk on surfaces, but also works to fizz away perspiration stains on white fabrics. Keep a spray bottle filled with a peroxide and water mixture near the washing machine; spritz spots and rinse with clean water before starting a load. If you don’t have hydrogen peroxide in the house, or need to safely remove stains from colored fabrics, try club soda or diluted vinegar instead. (See References 5)

Olive Oil
Blend 1 cup of olive oil and 1/2 cup of lemon juice in a spray bottle, mist onto a soft cloth and polish wood furniture the natural way. Polishing with olive oil moisturizes wood and imparts a lovely shine; lemon juice cleans the surface and leaves behind a fresh scent that beats out aerosol wood dusting sprays in the green department.

Market News

WELCOME CLG CUSTOMERS
WELCOME USLG MEMBERS

THE MARKET IS OPEN FOR ORDERING!

Order today for pickup Tuesday from 4-5:15PM at Clemson Montessori School. Tuesday 4-6 pm AT Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery or Wed 8-8 at Whole Foods Market Greenvile. SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE DETAILS OR TEXT 864-353-6096

*ANNOUNCEMENT! DOING BOOKS:
DEPOSITS: PLEASE KEEP YOUR ACCOUNTS AT ZERO; NOT MORE, NOT LESS, AS WE ARE BALANCING OUR BOOKS. If you owe us, please reconcile, or if we owe you, please speak up. putneyfarm@aol.com
*LOOKING FOR HELPERS WHO ARE INTERESTED IN LEARNING ADMINISTRATIVE SKILLS FOR RUNNING A COMMUNITY BASED ONLINE FARMER’S MARKET. MUCH TO GAIN FROM THIS EXPERIENCE, and a great interning opportunity. Contact Donna 864-353-8096
Would you like a “say” in how the Upstate Locally Grown family should grow? Do you have suggestions, comments, questions? We always welcome comments, but if you would like to be on an online discussion which will influence the way we go, please copy Donna for your seat on the forum. (putneyfarm@aol.com) (See below for related information)

Changing with the times:As the very first market of our kind in South Carolina,Upstate Locally Grown online Farmer’s Market and its sister Markets, Clemson and Greenwood Locally Grown have been the leaders, the precedent setters, and the, uh, well, guinea pig for the markets which followed. The Upstate has gone through many changes and transitions in the nearly seven years of our existence, and all the Upstate has become so much “greener”. Many, Many different marketing opportunities have opened up for the 40 plus sustainable growers who have graced our website along the way. So, as times change, and needs change, We at USLG are ready to proceed into another phase. We need your help in order to do this. Upstate Locally Grown has always operated as a not-for profit, even though we haven’t applied for this status. What this means is that all of our efforts went toward promoting Upstate growers, and all proceeds went toward that goal. No-one has ever gotten a salary; thousands of donated hours were accrued towards getting you the freshest, purest, most healthy foods available anywhere. Many have told us that we did succeed in our goals of making the Upstate aware of the need to support the local foods movement in order to keep small farms and businesses growing.
Now we are moving up to applying for non-profit status. USLG would be, as always, dedicated to promoting local, sustainable foods, growers, and food systems, plus local small businesses. We plan to expand our horizons and become more education-oriented. If any of you have had experience in the field of non-profits, and would like to offer a little help, we are open to a helping hand in this.
We are also seeking interns and volunteers who would benefit from the experience of entering into a new era of local food systems.
Specifically, we are looking for people to contribute articles, distribute food, meet growers and interview them, and help with the web site and social media. We are willing to train you, and there will be some benefits. Please contact Donna at 864-353-6096.

We thank you for registering at Upstate Locally Grown and “Clemson Locally Grown:”Clemson.locallygrown.net.
Please encourage your friends and co-workers to join us in the effort to make farm-to table food a regular part of our lives.

Upstate Locally Grown donates 3 percent of our order sales right off the top to Broken Wing Farm, a project to teach autistic boys the art of growing food.
Clemson Locally Grown Donates 3%of your sales to Clemson Montessori School.

FREE MONTH OF MEMBERSHIP!*
Did you know, anyone who has a recipe or article published in the Harvest News is entitled to one added month of membership! Tell us about your garden, share your favorite eats with us, or even a book review. Please email your CLG content to Heidi.

Donna’s Corner



Heidi C Williams, Clemson Market Coordinator

We really appreciate all of you, as Upstate Locally Grown cannot work without a cooperative effort of all concerned. And thanks to Heidi C Williams, CLG coordinator, my encourager, who keeps me focused on the good that we are doing and why it is all worth it, even when things go haywire, as things tend to do sometimes.
Here is a cause that is near and dear to my heart, and I am sure that it is of concern to many of you.
Did you know that 90% of our heirloom seeds are now gone? Why dies that matter? It is very important that these seeds, which were passed from generation-to-generation are preserved. You see, these seeds are from plants that have passed the test of time and endured; endured droughts, floods, pest invasions, and other natural disasters. These are seeds from plants that taste delicious, look great, grow well, and are sturdy. If we let these go by the wayside, we will be letting go of reliable seed stock and substituting weak and unnaturally structured plants. The Genetically modified seeds CANNOT reproduce.
What are GMO’s, you say? ‘From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia":http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_organism
"A genetically modified organism (GMO) is an organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques. Organisms that have been genetically modified include micro-organisms such as bacteria and yeast, insects, plants, fish, and mammals. GMOs are the source of genetically modified foods, and are also widely used in scientific research and to produce goods other than food. The term GMO is very close to the technical legal term, ’living modified organism’ defined in the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, which regulates international trade in living GMOs (specifically, “any living organism that possesses a novel combination of genetic material obtained through the use of modern biotechnology”).

This article focuses on what organisms have been genetically engineered, and for what purposes." ~http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_organism
“here”: is a link to a video where a darling child explains what GMS’s are so that even a child can understand. (Cute too!)
Why worry? GMO’s have been proven to adversely affect our health.
If you have time please: Watch the full-length documentary The World According to Monsanto
here is news about a new study showing how GMO’s negatively affect mouse blood.
“here” is a link to an article talking about CRIIGEN Study Links GM Maize and Roundup to Premature Death and Cancer Study Links GM Maize and Roundup to Premature Death and Cancer.
In this day and age of GMO vs. NON-GMO food, Going to the supermarket is a pretty confusing task to most. Use this category and colored coded shopping guide by Greenpeace to help make things a little easier.:
How To Avoid GMO Foods – Organic Shopping Guide Category & Color Coded Greenpeace GMO shopping Guide

here is where you can download a non-GMO shopping guide to take with you to the grocery store.

SMALL ACTS, WHEN MULTIPLIED BY MILLIONS OF PEOPLE, CAN TRANSFORM THE WORLD
March Against Monsanto, a world-wide event happening on May 25
March Against Monsanto, Greenville
https://www.facebook.com/MarchAgainstMonsantoGreenvilleSC

Countdown:
21 days
517 hours
31066 minutes
1863981 seconds
from the time this article was written. Here is the link to the countdown timer.


The Whole Reason

Jess O’Neal Bayne and husband are organizing the Greenville, SC portion of this upcoming world-wide event. The main event is happening May 25 in Greenville and _all around the world . It is called March Against Monsanto. This is a march and rally in response to the “Monsanto Protection Act,” recently signed by President Obama as a part of HR 933.
You can organize a rally un your town. View some of the world’s cities already participating.
If you are like me, and care about what you put into your body,(and I know you care) I encourage you to lend your support to this event.
“Be a Part Of The Change You Want to See”
Read Jess’s story about how caring what went into her children’s bodies got both Jess and her husband Aaron Bayne involved here
For more information, visit the Facebook site here.
the world-wide mission statement can be found here
Watch the full length documentary “The World According to Monsanto” here
DbVdVo-k

Donna and Lenard, Heidi, and the whole gang of Market helpers.