The Weblog

This page contains news, event information, and other items added by the market managers.

“Thanks to all who make this possible!!” ~
DM, Greenville SC
“I’m really happy with everything I received. How juicy and tasty
I’m so thankful for reliable growers and market.” ~ MC, Greenville SC



 
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Ordering to Close at 12 noon.


Hello Clemson!
Your opportunity to order fresh veggies and sustainable proteins for this week’s meals is coming to a close at noon today, Monday. Our drop-off will be from 4:15-5:15, however, if you need to make different arrangements, please contact me at 864-353-6096.
We will be adding a drop-off in Greenville to this site: Swamp Rabbit Café on the Swamp rabbit trail, so, if interested in this drop-off, please make a note on your order form.
Speaking of making notes, you can give us feed-back when ordering; to just make a note to me; write in the manager’s messages, but you can also make a note under any product that you order, sending a message to me as well as to your grower. This comes in handy, say, if you would like a certain weight of meat or you want something special; something handled in a certain way; or even just to say “Last week’s order tasted delicious” or if you appreciate the trouble your growers take to package your order just for you.
Hope to see you tomorrow, Tuesday.
Just a little note here to say that your purchases go to support Upstate growers and their families, and a portion of each sale goes directly to Clemson Montessori School.
We are working with one of our growers who is helping Autistic young adults. Welch and Son Farm is becoming a 5013c organization dedicated to training these young men to farm, and is gearing towards providing housing, as well. Please be sure to sample Welch and Son Free-ranged chicken. You can purchase it on CLG whole or in parts. The profits from Welch’s products are entirely dedicated to running his farm and raising his autistic son, Chris, plus training other autistic boys-to-men. More details are coming after some very important meetings, so stay tuned.
See you Tuesday.
Donna

Just a Reminder To Order for Tuesday's Drop-off


Hello all!
It has been a beautiful weekend, and, if yu are like me, you have been outside and not sitting at the computer. So, when you do get back in, remember to put your orders in for this week.
We have WheatGrass for those of you who would like it for spring decorations or juicing, or green smoothies. It is a cut-and-come again container of live green food chock full of chlorophyll, vitamins, and minerals. We build live cells with living food, and what can be more lively than something still growing? My indoor cats enjoy munching on their own container of wheat grass, and the chickens go crazy over it. Get all the benefits of live food when you order a pack od wheat grass, snip some off and let it re-grow for another round.
Another live food is green garlic. Garlic is great for warding off colds and vampires, and green garlic is freshly dug just for you. You can crush it in the garlic press, or just thinly slice or finely chop and all to soups and salads. Because Green garlic is fresh, it naturally is packed with live nutrients, too!
started pea plants are available too, and can go outside afer a few days of conditioning. They have been grown outside in an unheated greenhouse this week,
Soon it will be time to plant the cool weather brassicas, and we are busily starting those for you in case you didn’t. Here’s hoping you have a fantastic day and that you find our choice of fresh winter greens and sustainable protein pleasing to your palate! We love being able to provide this farm-to-table experience for you!
Donna Click here
to order.

Harvest News: Thurs, March 7-Monday, March 11


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Clemson Locally Grown Market
http://clemson.locallygrown.net/

To Contact Us

CLICK HERE TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT STATUS
TO CONTACT US
Market Administrator
Donna Putney

USLG GREENVILLE MARKET MANAGER Anna Schneider
HARVEST NEWS EDITOR/ CLEMSON MARKET MANAGER
Heidi Williams
GREENWOOOD MARKET MANAGER/VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR
Virginia Dumont Poston
DROP_OFF SCHEDULE

Recipes


Beef And Barley Soup
Ingredients for Beef Broth
2 1/2 to 3 pounds soup bones, with meat *
1 large onion, halved widthwise *
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste
Freshly ground black pepper

Soup
5 tablespoons olive oil, divided
3 medium carrots, peeled, halved lengthwise and cut into 1/4-inch thick slices
2 ribs celery, halved and cut into 1/4-inch thick slices
2 medium parsnips, peeled, halved and cut into 1/4-inch thick slices
1 small onion, coarsely chopped
1 small potato, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes *
1 cup pearl barley
2 leafy sprigs fresh thyme
8 ounces sliced white or cremini mushrooms
Chopped parsley (optional) *

Preheat the broiler. Toss the beef and onion with 3 tablespoons of oil and arrange in a single layer on a foil-lined sheet pan. Set the pan about 4 inches beneath the broiler. Broil, turning partway through, until richly browned on both sides — 3 to 4 minutes per side.

Set the browned meat and onion in a stockpot or heavy soup pot. Add Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, salt, pepper and water (at least 2 1/2 quarts) to cover. Bring just to the boil and reduce to a simmer. After about 10 minutes, skim off any foam that’s collected at the top. Continue simmering over the lowest possible heat for 1 1/2 to 2 hours.

While the broth is simmering, heat 3 tablespoons olive oil in a large, heavy skillet. When hot, add the carrots, celery, parsnips and onion and saute until just slightly softened, about 5 minutes.

When the meat is falling-apart tender, lift it out with a slotted spoon and allow it to cool slightly on a cutting board. Strain the broth into a clean soup pot — you should have about 1 1/2 quarts —and add the sauteed vegetables. Add the potato, barley and thyme to the pot. Pull apart the reserved meat into small chunks with your fingers, including the gelatinous tendon if you wish, and add to the soup pot. Bring mixture to a simmer and cover until the barley and meat are tender, 45 to 60 minutes. Stir occasionally, adding more water if consistency becomes too thick.

Meanwhile, in the skillet you used for the vegetables, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat until it shimmers. Add the mushrooms and saute, turning, until lightly browned, 4 to 5 minutes.

When the barley and potatoes are tender, add the mushrooms and season with salt and pepper to taste. Garnish with chopped parsley, if desired.

“*” indicates ingredient is available on Upstate Locally Grown

Recipe from NPR’s Kitchen Window.

Market News

WELCOME CLEMSON USLG CUSTOMERS

The countdown to Spring has begun. Use the next food pickup to stock up on all your winter faves. The next Clemson delivery will be THIS Tuesday, March 12, 2013 at the Clemson Montessori School. from 4:30-5 p.m.

Nature’s Beef is all stocked up and ready for your beef orders. Many of us have met Richard Taylor, owner of Nature’s Beef, when he’s come from Honea Path to help Donna with the drop off. Richard’s farm, Bar T Ranch, consists of 480 acres and is located in Anderson County, centrally located, about 25 miles from Anderson, Greenville, Greenwood and Laurens.

His grandfather purchased the land in the 1930s, as all southern farms in those days, it was mostly growing cotton and raising mules. The first beef cattle were purchased in the 1940s. Purebred Angus were purchased in the 1950s.

Today, Bar T Ranch is home to the third- and fourth-generation farmers, working together to provide a safe, wholesome, and nutritious product for your family. By using the tools available in the cattle industry today, along with the Lord’s guidance, Richard feels as though these goals are definitely achievable. Many of their cuts of beef – steaks, roasts or hamburger, over 30 different cuts in all, as well as purchasing a half or whole beef.

To inquire about a half or whole cow, contact Richard at (864) 369-7181 or visit his Web site at
http://www.naturesbeef.net/.

Spurgeon Farm still has a variety of winter veggies, including collards, beets, kale, and more. Check out their offerings and more under vegetables.

In addition to your order of Putney Farm Eggs (duck and chicken) and sweet potatoes, Nature’s Beef, Welch & Son sausage and chicken, Happy Cow milk products, Swamp Rabbit Cafe baked goods, and more, be sure to click on vegetables on the left-hand navigation bar of our market page and spend some time browsing veggies.

Occasional CSA Box
For veggie lovers with commitment issues
No need to pay up front. We will give you what’s fresh and bountiful in an occasional box for $25. Just order as you like, once a week, once a month, or just once in a while. Here are a few things you can look for in this week’s $25, occasional CSA box. Be sure to order yours today! We have a limited number of these available, so act fast!

- salad microgreens
- winter greens from Spurgeon farms
- Happy Cow cheese
- and a few fun surprises!

We thank you for registering at Clemson Locally Grown Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join you.

Clemson Locally Grown donates 3 percent of our order profits to Clemson Montessori School, in return for use of their school parking lot as a drop-off location. We also appreciate the helpful hands of CMS market volunteers. Feel free to lend your hands, if you have a moment to do so.

Donna’s Corner

This week, I wanted to share with you this article about the difference between organic and sustainable and beyond organic farms that protect soil and food quality by avoiding:

  • pesticides
  • chemical fertilizers
  • herbicides
  • antibiotics
  • growth hormones
  • and genetically modified seed.

USDA Certified Organic is a real certification. Sustainable is not a certified label or official policy. Most people consider sustainability a philosophy that describes planet protective actions that can be continued indefinitely, without causing damage to the environment.

That said, while you can’t officially label a food product as “Sustainable,” sustainable farming is not just a philosophy. Sustainability is observable and measurable via economic profit, social benefits for the community and environmental conservation.
There are various definitions of sustainable agriculture. The Alliance for Sustainability offers four goals based on the following values:

  • Ecological soundness
  • Economic viability
  • Social justice
  • Humaneness

Part of the definition offered by ATTRA, the National Sustainable Agricultural INformation Service, includes: “Sustainable agriculture is one that produces abundant food without depleting the earth’s resources or polluting its environment. It is agriculture that follows the principles of nature to develop systems for raising crops and livestock that are, like nature, self-sustaining. Sustainable agriculture is also the agriculture of social values, one whose success is indistinguishable from vibrant rural communities, rich lives for families on the farms, and wholesome food for everyone. But in the ?rst decade of the 21st Century, sustainable agriculture, as a set of commonly accepted practices or a model farm economy, is still in its infancy—more than an idea, but only just.”

The U.S. Department of Agriculture provides a legal definition that says it is an "an integrated system of plant and animal production practices having a site-specific application that will, over the long-term

  • Satisfy human food and fiber needs.
  • Enhance environmental quality and the natural resource base upon which the agriculture economy depends.
  • Make the most efficient use of nonrenewable resources and on-farm resources and integrate, where appropriate, natural biological cycles and controls.
  • Sustain the economic viability of farm operations.
  • Enhance the quality of life for farmers and society as a whole.

The bottom line is that sustainable agriculture provides an opportunity for small farmers to make a living for themselves and their families by embracing farming practices we can all be proud of, by acting as stewards of the earth and the animals who share the planet with us.

Happy eating!
Donna

FREE MONTH OF MEMBERSHIP!
Did you know, anyone who has a recipe or article published in the Harvest News is entitled to one added month of membership! Tell us about your garden, share your favorite eats with us, or even a book review. Please email your CLG content to Heidi.

We appreciate Clemson Montessori School for allowing us to host our drop-off in their shady parking lot!

And we thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally produced foods possible! Be sure to “like” us on Facebook so you can stay in touch with all the latest updates.

Have a wonderful week, happy shopping on USLG, and may you enjoy good family meals from all your goodies!

Donna and Lenard, Heidi, and the whole gang of Market helpers.

Order Now for March 5 Tuesday Drop- Off and Free Gift


Free Free, FREE!!! What? A free gift just fopr ordering???
Yes, any order over 10 Bucks receives a FREE GIFT! A $5.00 value, and you will be able to choose which FREE GIFT you want!
I will phone or email you with your choices and deliver your gift to the drop-off free of charge for being a fan of Clemson Locally Grown!
Aren’t we fortunate, friends, here in the Upstate, to have living food at the click of a button? Live, fresh eggs, fresh, growing wheat-grass and microgreens, fresh-picked greens full of chlorophyl and vibrant with life? And for you omnivores, Flash-frozen meats from open-air grazed fields? We at Upstate Locally Grown strive to find you the freshest, greenest, and most alive foods available anywhere! They are picked fresh for you at the very peak of their ripeness, cooled, and shuttled to you in our little white veggie-van, always in coolers to preserve the vibrancy, crispness, and nutrition. We are what we eat, and we produce live cells from living foods! The milk that we bring to you is from the latest and freshest batch, the greens were in the field earlier that day, and the eggs are always freshly laid! What more can you ask, than for the grower to go out and pick/pull, gather, and harvest just for you, and send it quickly on to your kitchen?
Please tell your friends about us, and ask them to mention that you sent us. You will receive 10% off your order when your friend writes a note on their order that you sent them!
So, hurry and order this week, becaus you will want to get your FREE GIFT! Ordering closes Monday at 9.

Harvest News: Thurs., Feb. 28-Mon., March 4


-




h1. Clemson Locally Grown Market
http://clemson.locallygrown.net/

To Contact Us

CLICK HERE TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT STATUS
TO CONTACT US
Market Administrator
Donna Putney

USLG GREENVILLE MARKET MANAGER Anna Schneider
HARVEST NEWS EDITOR/ CLEMSON MARKET MANAGER
Heidi Williams
GREENWOOOD MARKET MANAGER/VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR
Virginia Dumont Poston
DROP_OFF SCHEDULE

Recipes


Collard and White Bean Soup
Filling and satisfying. Courtesy Mollie Katzen and the Moosewood Cookbook
Ingredients:
1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil
2 cups chopped onions *
1 bay leaf
2 stalks celery, minced
2 medium-sized carrots, diced
2 teaspoons salt (or more, to taste)
6 cups stock or water
3 to 4 cups cooked white beans (or two cans)
3 tablespoons minced fresh garlic
1 1/2 pounds collard greens, stemmed and chopped *
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
TOPPINGS:
Freshly-grated nutmeg
Finely minced fresh parsley *
Parmesan cheese *
Preparation

Heat the oil in a kettle or Dutch oven, add the onion, bay leaf, celery, carrots, and salt. Cook over low heat for about 10 minutes, then add stock or water. Cover, bring to a boil, then lower heat to a simmer. Cook quietly for about 20 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender.
Add the beans, garlic, and as much of the collard greens as you can fit, cover and wait a few minutes for the greens to cook down. Keep adding greens in batches, waiting between additions for them to cook down, which they ultimately will.
Add black pepper to taste, and adjust the salt. Serve hot, topped with a grating or two of fresh nutmeg, a little parsley, and a generous spoonful of parmesan cheese.

The great thing about this recipe, is you can use any kind of white beans: the smaller navy beans, the medium-sized Great Northern, or the large cannellini. Also, the recipe calls for collard greens, but you can also use escarole or spinach, or a combination.

“*” indicates ingredient is available on Upstate Locally Grown

Market News

WELCOME CLEMSON USLG CUSTOMERS

The countdown to Spring has begun. Use the next food pickup to stock up on all your winter faves. The next Clemson delivery will be THIS Tuesday, March 5, 2013 at the Clemson Montessori School. from 4:30-5 p.m.

Welch & Son Farm has organic, free-range chickens back. These tender young birds are delicious and cook up perfectly from beginning to end. We recommend making use of your whole bird, by saving the bones, and making a fresh stock with them. A handful of fresh Putney herbs is a nice addition to any roasted chicken or stock recipe.

We have plenty of chicken back packages, chicken feet, and whole chickens, as well as one whole turkey. Nature’s Beef is well stocked, so check out their beef offerings. Next week watch for some started Brassicas!

Spurgeon Farm still has a variety of winter veggies, including collards, beets, kale, and more. Check out their offerings and more under vegetables.

In addition to your order of Putney Farm Eggs (duck and chicken) and sweet potatoes, Nature’s Beef, Welch & Son sausage and chicken, Happy Cow milk products, Swamp Rabbit Cafe baked goods, and more, be sure to click on vegetables on the left-hand navigation bar of our market page and spend some time browsing veggies. More greens and other late winter vegetables will be available in the coming weeks.

Occasional CSA Box
For veggie lovers with commitment issues
No need to pay up front. We will give you what’s fresh and bountiful in an occasional box for $25. Just order as you like, once a week, once a month, or just once in a while. Here are a few things you can look for in this week’s $25, occasional CSA box. Be sure to order yours today! We have a limited number of these available, so act fast!

- sweet potatoes, small
- snow pea plants
- living wheat grass
- salad microgreens
- Bonus this week: a free 1/2 doz Duck eggs. We hope you will experiment and send us ideas of what you have done with your duck eggs!


Sustainable Food Expert and Author to Speak at Clemson
A national leader in the local foods movement will speak at Clemson University 6:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 6, offering a vision of how the nation can move toward a sustainable and secure future.

Farmer, professor and author Philip Ackerman-Leist will explore local-scale food from a national perspective and propose strategies for creating more democratic and secure food systems in his presentation at the Strom Thurmond Institute auditorium. The event is open to the public and free of charge.

Ackerman-Leist’s work focuses on examining and reshaping local and regional food systems from the ground up. It’s not enough to say “local food” and declare victory, said Ackerman-Liest. “We need to invest in thoughtful planning, not just local foods, and we have to begin thinking about local food systems as citizens, not just consumers. We must also bring more diverse representation to the table and stretch our thinking from local realities to regional possibilities.”

Author of “Rebuilding the Foodshed” and “Up Tunket Road,” Ackerman-Leist is a professor at Green Mountain College in Vermont, where he established the college’s farm and sustainable agriculture curriculum and is director of the Green Mountain College Farm & Food Project. He also founded and directs the college’s Masters in Sustainable Food Systems, the nation’s first online graduate program in food systems, which features applied comparative research of students’ home bioregions.

The presentation is sponsored by the Clemson Sustainable Agriculture Program. The Barnes and Noble campus bookshop will have copies of Ackerman-Leist’s books, “Rebuilding the Foodshed” and “Up Tunket Road,” for sale at the program, after which there will be a book-signing and refreshments.

We thank you for registering at Clemson Locally Grown Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join you.

Clemson Locally Grown donates 3 percent of our order profits to Clemson Montessori School, in return for use of their school parking lot as a drop-off location. We also appreciate the helpful hands of CMS market volunteers. Feel free to lend your hands, if you have a moment to do so.

Donna’s Corner


Dirt Woman here!

It is getting around to that time when we are all getting antsy for spring. That means my microgreens are on their way in, along with plenty of other greenhouse goodies we’re trying for the first time here at Putney Farm.

In the meantime, can I take a moment to tell you a little about one of my favorite foods? Seeds! (And it’s not just because I’m a bird lady!) A seed is life. It is a living food. It is impossible to eat a raw seed and not derive nutrition.

Many seeds are edible and the majority of human calories come from seeds, especially from legumes and nuts. Seeds also provide most cooking oils, many beverages and spices and some important food additives. In different seeds the seed embryo or the endosperm dominates and provides most of the nutrients. The storage proteins of the embryo and endosperm differ in their amino acid content and physical properties.

Always remember, eat seeds naturally…eat them raw. This also means they can be soaked, ground or mashed (i.e. tahini), especially if a seed’s shell or coat is too difficult to pierce with the teeth.

Other tips:
- Choose raw and unsalted seeds
- Avoid coated or roasted seeds
- Avoid sugar coated seeds
- I like to add mine to cottage cheese and green smoothies.


Here’s one of my favorite seeds, CHIA SEEDS … because they are:
- 2.5 times more protein than kidney beans
- 3 times the antioxidant strength of blueberries
- 3 times more iron than spinach
- 6 times more calcium than milk
- 7 times more vitamin C than oranges
- 8 times more omega-3 than salmon
- 10 times more fiber than rice
- 15 times more magnesium than broccoli

Happy eating!
Donna

FREE MONTH OF MEMBERSHIP!
Did you know, anyone who has a recipe or article published in the Harvest News is entitled to one added month of membership! Tell us about your garden, share your favorite eats with us, or even a book review. Please email your CLG content to Heidi.

We appreciate Clemson Montessori School for allowing us to host our drop-off in their shady parking lot!

And we thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally produced foods possible! Be sure to “like” us on Facebook so you can stay in touch with all the latest updates.

Have a wonderful week, happy shopping on USLG, and may you enjoy good family meals from all your goodies!

Donna and Lenard, Heidi, and the whole gang of Market helpers.

Market Closes for the Week at Noon Today


Hey, folks! Still time to order winter veggies from your all-local online farmer’s market. Drop-off will be Tuesday at 4:30-5:15. And if you can’t make the drop-off hours, we will gladly make arrangements with you so you don’t miss out on all the fresh local goodies.
Only Upstate Locally Grown members will be able to order this year’s Putney Farm CSA, and it promises to be chuck full of a great variety of veggies and eggs.
We will also have a protein CSA and the Occasional CSA featuring our best and favorite growers and always including protein and veggies.
So, go to www.clemson.locallygrown.net and get your order in this week for either the occasional CSA or your choice from the rich variety of winter veggies.

Harvest News: CSA alert and more ... Your Market is Open Thurs-Mon, Feb. 21-25, 2013


-




h1. Clemson Locally Grown Market
http://clemson.locallygrown.net/

To Contact Us

CLICK HERE TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT STATUS
TO CONTACT US
Market Administrator
Donna Putney

USLG GREENVILLE MARKET MANAGER Anna Schneider
HARVEST NEWS EDITOR/ CLEMSON MARKET MANAGER
Heidi Williams
GREENWOOOD MARKET MANAGER/VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR
Virginia Dumont Poston
DROP_OFF SCHEDULE

Recipes


Fresh Roasted Free-Range Chicken
Simple and delicious!
Ingredients:
1 (4-pound) whole organic Welch & Son chicken*
8 sprigs green garlic*
4 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary*
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Olive oil
Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 425°.
2. Remove and discard giblets and neck from chicken. Rinse chicken with cold water; pat dry. Trim excess fat. Starting at neck cavity, loosen skin from breast and drumsticks by inserting fingers, gently pushing between skin and meat.
3. Combine garlic and rosemary. Rub seasoning mixture under loosened skin and into the body cavity. Sprinkle salt and pepper evenly over entire outside surface of chicken.
4. Place chicken in a shallow roasting pan coated with cooking spray. Bake at 425° for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 375°; bake 1 hour or until a thermometer registers 180°. Let stand 5 minutes.

“*” indicates ingredient is available on Upstate Locally Grown

Market News

WELCOME CLEMSON USLG CUSTOMERS

The countdown to Spring has begun. Use the next food pickup to stock up on all your winter faves. The next Clemson delivery will be THIS Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013 at the Clemson Montessori School. from 4:30-5 p.m.

Welch & Son Farm has organic, free-range chickens back. These tender young birds are delicious and cook up perfectly from beginning to end. We recommend making use of your whole bird, by saving the bones, and making a fresh stock with them. A handful of fresh Putney herbs is a nice addition to any roasted chicken or stock recipe.

Spurgeon Farm still has a variety of winter veggies, including collards, beets, kale, and more. Check out their offerings and more under vegetables.

In addition to your order of Putney Farm Eggs (order early; supply expected to be low) and sweet potatoes, Nature’s Beef, Welch & Son sausage and chicken, Happy Cow milk products, Swamp Rabbit Cafe baked goods, and more, be sure to click on vegetables on the left-hand navigation bar of our market page and spend some time browsing veggies. More greens and other fall vegetables will be available in the coming weeks.


Duck Eggs
Duck eggs are a very good alternative to chicken eggs, and we have them here at Clemson Locally Grown. Duck eggs are much larger in general, and have a very nice rich flavor and texture. Ducks graze much more than chickens do, so the eggs are richer. They are excellent for baking, in omelets, hard boiled … order yours today!

Occasional CSA Box
For veggie lovers with commitment issues
No need to pay up front. We will give you what’s fresh and bountiful in an occasional box for $25. Just order as you like, once a week, once a month, or just once in a while. Here are a few things you can look for in this week’s $25, occasional CSA box. Be sure to order yours today! We have a limited number of these available, so act fast!
-
- Putney Farm eggs and sweet potatoes
- Spurgeon Farm kale
-

We thank you for registering at Clemson Locally Grown Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join you.

Clemson Locally Grown donates 3 percent of our order profits to Clemson Montessori School, in return for use of their school parking lot as a drop-off location. We also appreciate the helpful hands of CMS market volunteers. Feel free to lend your hands, if you have a moment to do so.

Donna’s Corner


Hi all!

We are getting geared up to have a fantastic season with veggies at Putney Farm, which is why we are considering opening up a few CSAs. I have already started seedlings for kohlrabi, cabbage, spinach, bunching onions, potatoes, broccoli, lettuce, chives, and much more to come! We have purchased a small greenhouse to start our seedlings, and will be offering started plants as well.

My specialty is flowers, but herbs and veggies come in a close second. We will be growing a complete variety of veggies this year; hoping to cover all the veggies for ourselves and a few others. We also have asparagus and strawberries, as well as blueberries and perhaps blackberries in limited amounts.

We have cut back on chickens, and will offer first to our USLG members before we send to our commercial outlet, Swamp Rabbit Cafe.

— Donna

FREE MONTH OF MEMBERSHIP!
Did you know, anyone who has a recipe or article published in the Harvest News is entitled to one added month of membership! Tell us about your garden, share your favorite eats with us, or even a book review. Please email your CLG content to Heidi.

We appreciate Clemson Montessori School for allowing us to host our drop-off in their shady parking lot!

And we thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally produced foods possible! Be sure to “like” us on Facebook so you can stay in touch with all the latest updates.

Have a wonderful week, happy shopping on USLG, and may you enjoy good family meals from all your goodies!

Donna and Lenard, Heidi, Anna, Elizabeth, and the whole gang of Market helpers.

Market Open for ordering: Drop-off Tuesday


Clemson Locally Grown Market
http://clemson.locallygrown.net/

Hello Folks.
Each week, we are so happy to see old friends at the drop-off, and excited to welcome new ones. Your love of local, sustainable foods from some of the Upstate’s finest growers is what keeps us going!
Soon it will be time to put in our gardens, in fact, some of us have already had garlic and onions in for a while, and have seeds started inside. Some of the first veggies that aren’t greens will be snow and snap peas; CAN"T WAIT!
We have started some micro and baby greens and soon will be sharing some of them with you.
Seedlings and plant starts will be ready for you when you are ready for them, so please let us know what you would like to plant in your garden.
We are seeking writers, photos, tidbits to include in our newsletter. If you have an item of interest, or an article to share with us, please let me know via email, and we may just publish you in our weblog.
What’s good this week?
Chives are looking good right now; the skinny kind that gives your dish a garlic/onion taste when snipped into it. You can also freeze these after snipping into small pieces for use later on in the season when things get a little too warm for these delicious condiments.
Well I am so sory for all the “centering”….I’m having troubles when I put our LOGO at the top; have to admit that I need to study up on HTML.
Happy ordering!
Donna
864-901-2692 Text me any time you have a question, comment or suggestion.

Weekend Update and Reminder


Hello Folks!
First of all, a reminder for those of you who need a little nudge; “hey, Ordering ends tomorrow at noon, so please take a couple of minutes to get your requests in.”
Our Drop-off hours are now 4:30-5:30, but the closer you come to 4:30, the earlier I can head for home, and get there before dark. The chickens really don’t like it when I stay out after dark, Ha, Ha! (No, really, I just don’t care for driving down those narrow and curvey dark country roads after dark. You never know when a deer might pop out of the woods or a speed-crazed driver might be hogging his side of the road and half of mine while taking the curves on two wheels. Ha, ha, I’m just being silly, of course. Or am I exaggerating a little?)
Seriously, though, if you find that you can’t get to the drop-off in the time that we have set, we will be glad to make arrangements to leave them with someone else who lives closer to you than I do, or to leave them at the drop-off on a porch, if you are going to be just a little late.
We are busy as bees planting seeds of cool-weather veggies and will have plants available for you to order. What plants would you like for us to save for you?
See you on Tuesday, 4:30-5:30.
Donna 864-353-6096

Clemson Locally Grown is Now Open


We have Fresh Free-range eggs just for you, and here is some info about the superior nutrition of eggs:
“Eggs are an easy and versatile way to get that high-quality protein to help get through the day along with vitamin D. This site
suggests a few quick and easy egg recipes to give you an extra boost of vitamin D this winter season”:
http://www.naturalsolutionsmag.com/news-item/cloudy-chance-vitamin-d
Or Just click here? to go directly to recipes.
Remember to get your greens in for vibrant health, too. Don’t feel you have time to mess with cleaning and chopping greens? Collards from Spurgeon Farms are one of the products that are already cut and washed for you.
This week is the week that the final calves of the season for Taylor Farms are born. It is an exciting time in our neighborhood! Taylor’s meat is all free-ranged, no chemical horomones nor antibiotics, and I personally know that they are well-cared for. Mr. Taylor even gets up during the night to check on his cows to be sure they are safe.
Some of the roasts are unavailable now, however, there is plenty of selection for your dinner.

Did you know that the cosmetics industry is totally unregulatred, and can put anything at all in Their products?
This
is about the chemicals in our cosmetics, baby care, etc.

Hope to see you Tuesday 4:30-5:30. If you can’t make it in that time slot, let me know and we will be glad to make arrangements.*864-353-6096 * This drop-off will be the one deciding factor that will influence our decision about whether to stay weekly or to go by-weekly again. Can you give us some feed-back about it? And, mark down my phone number. You can text me any ole time with any question or comment.
*864-353-6096 *
Best to you!
Donna